Munich street style – Oktoberfest special edition

Hey, hey dear readers 🙂 I’ve been in Munich during the Oktoberfest and I had an amazing time there. I got to relax, shop and have a lot of fun:) Of course, other then trying out scary rides, drinking beer and enjoying everything Munich has to offer, I also captured some of the diversity of German traditional wear during this festival and created for you the Oktoberfest street style edition 🙂

Photography by: Jovana Markovic

Everyone was wearing some kind of Bavarian wear. Literally everyone. It’s so adorable! And 7 million people from around the world participate in this festival, consuming more than 6 million liters of Bavarian beer. That’s 1 million gallons of beer in less then 3 weeks 🙂 And millions of these cute outfits in all styles, shapes and colors were walking through the streets of Munich during the Oktoberfest.

Oktoberfest street style
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

One of my favorite combinations that I’ve seen there is this one in the pic above. They look almost royal! Big cleavage is also a part of the Oktoberfest traditional look together with the bow on the waist indicating weather you are single if the bow is placed on the left side or not single if the bow is on the right side 🙂

Oktoberfest street style
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

Every day, every hour, everywhere in Munich people are looking like this during the festival. They all wear the same, but everyone looks so different and unique. Fashion magic ladies and gentlemen 🙂

Oktoberfest street style
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

There aren’t very many Dirndl and Lederhosen (Bavarian wear for women and men) makers outside of Germany, so your best bet for finding a classic, well-made Tracht is to just wait until you get to Munich. 🙂 Especially around the time of Oktoberfest, you won’t be able to walk too far before finding a vendor. Just keep in mind that everything is pricier during the festival! Of course, prices vary according to quality, but you should expect to pay anywhere between 200 to 600 euros for a complete outfit from good materials.

Oktoberfest street style
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

The typical Dirndl (Bavarian wear for girls) consists of a tight-fitting bodice over a puffy, white, low-cut blouse and a full skirt. Depending on the season, Dirndls come in all sorts of colors and can be made from cotton, linen, wool, or velvet.  And of course, pink is the dominating color among ladies while men usually pick earthy tones for their wear.

Oktoberfest
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

When it comes to having fun at the festival, it’s a place for everybody to enjoy. There are endless rides for kids and adults, 14 tents where over 12 000 people stop by for a beer and a bite daily, candy stations on every corner, souvenir shops, music everywhere you go and so much more….

Oktoberfest
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

According to my good friend Mr. Google, the first Oktoberfest was celebrated in Munich in 1810 in honor of Prince Ludwig’s marriage to Princess Therese von Sachsen-Hildburghausen. The festivities began October 12, 1810, and lasted for almost a week, until October 17. The public celebrations ended with an exciting horse race. After such a spectacular party, the happy couple decided that the same type of festival should be continued annually. In the following years, the galas were repeated every October, prolonged and, eventually moved forward into September primarily because of the weather.

Oktoberfest
Photography by: Jovana Markovic

Oktoberfest was an extraordinary experience for me and I can not wait to go back next year.

I hope you guys enjoyed the post! 

See you soon 🙂

Love,

J.

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